Meet Burkina

learning & sharing Burkina Faso


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Thoughts on a Thursday afternoon

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In picture: Feven with a 6-suction cup tentacle, and Katherine and Hannah, during lunch today at a Spanish restaurant.

Today has been one of the best days since being in Dakar.

First, I finally bought an adapter so I no longer need to rely on my Toubab friends to charge my laptop. I bought it from a vendor on the side of the road. I asked “Ñaata?” which is Wolof for “How much?” The guy said 600 francs. Then Hannah, my American friend who also needed an adapter, used her bargaining skills and offered 500 francs. He immediately agreed. Hannah and I both got one for 500 francs. But do you know the best part about that? That translates as $1 USD. Literally one dollar. Insanity. In the U.S. an adapter like this would be so expensive! Oh, actually there’s even a better part: it works.

Before that, a few other Americans and I went out for lunch at a Spanish restaurant. It was so much fun. After taking about 15 minutes to decide on our order, we placed it. Then the waitress came back and told us she had a better idea for us: tapas style, bring us several small plates of food to share. In general I don’t like eating tapas style, but we went with her suggestion and it was perfect. She selected for us six dishes and she brought them out like courses. First we had bread (of course) with olive oil, garlic, and tomato on it. The other courses will be almost impossible for me to describe but I’ll try. Next we had these breaded fritter things that have a filling comparable to a crab Rangoon without the crab flavor, but kind of with mashed potatoes in there too. Third we had some lightly fried fish fries with lime. Fourth we had some amazing shrimp, and a lot of it. Fifth we had some octopus/squid (is there a difference?) type stuff! It had weird tentacles and it was obvious that the animal was very large. It was served over potato slices. Just when we thought it couldn’t get better, she brought out these sandwich type things. The bottom piece of bread was similar to the first course. The top piece of bread was what you could get if you crossed mashed potatoes and fresh bread. It sounds weird when I describe it, but every single thing was delicious. In total we each paid equivalent to $6. Expensive for lunch here, but beyond worth it. Plus we all were happy and giggly and the restaurant was outdoors and decorated beautifully. I could go on but I won’t.

It’s only three in the afternoon. I had Wolof class this morning, but my other class today got moved to tomorrow. The rest of the afternoon I plan to study because I have a lot due next week. I’m not sure what I’ll do tonight but hopefully something fun since Friday is my catch-up-on-sleep day, (no class, but my family members are at work).

I have to start my homework, but it’s only stuff that I’m excited to learn about. It’s 73 degrees and sunny and the birds are singing. My hands smell like clementines, my tummy is full, and my heart is happy.

Learning Wolof: Am na xorom, he/she is salty (Used when you want to say someone is interesting)

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Ambassamor – Spreading love all over

Je suis arrivé à Paris !

Some people have asked me, “Why ‘ambassamor’?” It’s my username on several websites and social media outlets. It’s also in the URL for this blog.

“Amor” means love. “Amor” is love in Latin and Spanish. “Amour” is love in French.

An ambassador, a liaison, represents one country in another. When I travel and live abroad, I may, whether I want to or not, be the representation of the United States, young female Americans, Christians, to the people there.

To me, an ambassamor is someone who strives to, above all, show love. As an “ambassador” I might represent Americans, but as an ambassamor, I aim to be a loving one. The love I receive in my family, in my friend circles, in Christ – I want it to radiate from me and touch the lives of others.

My dream career in middle school was to be an ambassador. No matter what my future holds, however, I’ll always strive to be an ambassamor.

Learning French: “Le Sénégal t’attend avec impatience.” (Said to me last night by a Senegalese friend.) “Senegal waits for you with impatience.”