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learning & sharing Burkina Faso


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Empty Wallets, Full Hearts

Once a week I write and turn in an essay about my experiences here. Sometimes the essay topics are chosen for us, sometimes they just must relate to Senegal geography/history/culture, and sometimes they must be a personal reflection. I turn them in in French, but first I write in English in order to organize my thoughts and lay out a map. When I go to translate it into French, some of the sentences’ meanings change a little because of my limited French vocabulary or the non-existence of certain words. Also, when I write the first draft in English, I often choose my words based on what I know I can easily translate into French. Here is the most recent essay I wrote. It needed to be a personal reflection essay, but it’s always good when the essay relates to development which is the focus of the MSID program. The essay is the expansion of a journal entry I wrote near the beginning of my life in Dakar, but since that day I’ve been thinking about the topic a lot and forming an opinion. Here it is.


Empty wallets, full hearts

Since being in Senegal, my ideas and perceptions of many things have changed. My ideas about religion are being challenged, my ideas about myself are being challenged, and my ideas about poverty are being challenged greatly. “Poverty” is one of the first words the typical westerner thinks of when they think about Africa, and “development” is the most commonly proposed solution. Indeed, almost all development scholars include “reduction of poverty” in their definition of development. Since being here I find myself asking questions like, “What is poverty? Why is it an important topic?”

Some friends in the United States, upon hearing that I have a maid at my house here in Senegal, assume my family is rich. I’m not here to talk about my family’s income because truly I don’t know, but consider this scenario: if family A lives on $10 a day and woman B’s family lives on $1 a day, woman B might be willing to work for a wage well within the budget of a $10 a day family. Having a maid doesn’t mean you’re rich, but it means you’re wealthy when compared to someone else in your city. Maybe a family can’t afford a computer but they can afford a maid. Perhaps culturally maids are a higher priority when a family considers what they want to spend their money on.

Now yes, I know that I am in fact living in a relatively wealthy neighborhood in Dakar. But that’s just the thing: this neighborhood is relatively wealthy. Mermoz is wealthy when compared to other neighborhoods in Dakar, and Dakar is wealthy relative to other cities in Senegal. I would argue that relative wealth, and relative poverty, are the only values that are even relevant in a society. Absolute poverty, often expressed in American dollars as people living on less than $1.25 a day, seems almost entirely irrelevant to me. Although it might shed light on how Senegal as a nation compares to other nations in the world economically, it does nothing to talk about an individual’s daily life.

But even if relative poverty values are more relevant than absolute poverty values, I still find myself asking “What is poverty?” I think the more important questions to ask other than “Are these people poor?” are questions like: can they see a doctor if they want to? Can they go to school if they want to? Are they happy? If the answers to questions like these are “yes”, what does it matter how much money is in their bank account?

I’m not suggesting that the discussion of reducing poverty be taken off the table altogether. Surely reducing poverty will probably lend itself to giving people more access to medical treatment, schools, and happiness. However, what if putting more money in someone’s pocket doesn’t lend itself to better access or health? Maybe the infrastructure or the trained doctors aren’t there. What if more money in someone’s pocket doesn’t mean more access to education, if there isn’t a school within walking distance or the teachers are always on strike because of government corruption? What if money is in fact the root of all evil, and that simply more money won’t lead to more happiness? Have we ever seen that casual line between money and happiness proved?

I’m suggesting instead that we stop worrying so much about economic development, particularly on the individual level. Instead, we should ask questions about how many doctors there are, and how accessible clinics are. Are there adequate schools and supplies and are teachers treated well? Are people happy, do they feel empowered, are they free?

I think we are living in an interesting time in history, a time where there are the greatest wealth disparities in the world but the greatest awareness of what exists for the other half. With today’s media, Americans are aware, or at least think they are aware, of the poverty in Africa. Africans are aware of the wealth in the United States, even if the view gets skewed as it travels through the technology waves. But I think that it’s important to critically think about what poverty is so that when we as a world try to fight it, we build up healthier, smarter, and happier people, not bank accounts. Yes, I am living here comfortably. I think anyone could. But my family’s income and whether or not we have a maid does not define poverty. My family in Dakar is wealthy because we can see a doctor when we need to, go to school when we want to, and smile because we’re happy.


Learning French: passer la nuit à la belle étoile, to spend the night under the stars. (I wish.)

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A Weekend Away

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In picture: Tori dancing in Sokone. The women would come over to the group of Toubabs and select someone to dance. Tori was selected most frequently, which seems only fitting anyway since she won our group dance competition. Tori, however, was not amused.

I’m spending the weekend with my classmates in Toubacouta! I just arrived today, Thursday, and will be here until Sunday night. We have a lot planned and I’m sure you will hear more about it! It’s already been an amazing trip. The MSID program is truly incredible. Toubacouta is a somewhat touristy but village type place several hours south of Dakar. I’m excited to get off my beaten path for a while.

So many hilarious things have happened the past couple days. Many of them are probably “you had to be there” moments, but I’ll try to explain them anyway.

One of the funny things happened a few days ago. Yama was looking at one of my pictures on Facebook and said something about me being better in the U.S. At first I was confused about what he was saying… but then I said, yeah, my hair and skin is not as nice in Dakar. I can’t take normal showers, I sweat a lot, I’m dirtier much quicker. Then he said, in reference to his physical self, “Yama n’est pas comme sa”, which means ‘Yama is not like this.’ Basically he was saying that in the U.S. he would be even better. It was funny to think about.

Okay, so this story is hilarious! In our Country Analysis class, each day someone presents an article from the newspaper. Yesterday Cat was presenting her article to the class, (and mostly to the professor). When she was finished, to conclude, she looked the professor in the eye and said, “…et…je t’aime.” Oh my goodness. As soon as what she said registered, the entire class started laughing. The professor did too, because what else was he going to do. I didn’t stop laughing for about twenty minutes; for some reason it was extra funny for me. For those of you who don’t know French… after Cat finished talking, she looked the professor in the eye and said, “…and…. I love you.” I can’t even think about it without laughing. She meant to say ‘je l’aime’, to say that she loved the article. But professing her love to our old Senegalese teacher was so much better.

Today, so many other funny things happened. The stars of the show today were Tori and Waly. Waly because Waly usually is, with his casually dramatic humor and big smile that shows how amused he is at himself, or us. Tori was just crazy all day. Her peak moment was when Waly told the bus driver to stop and told us to look right, at the “monkey wedding”. There was probably 150 or 200 baboons in the field next to us! Tori freaked out. Monkeys were basically the reason she chose Senegal. I don’t know if I’ve ever seen a monkey in the wild, and I’ve certainly never seen that many monkeys at one time. It was insane.

We visited Sokone, another small town, and ate lunch at the mayor’s house. Then the people in the village came over and we all had a dance party. It was interesting to say the least. As soon as I have better wifi I will add a picture to this blog post.

Learning Wolof: nana, mint leaves. (They’re used in ataaya, and the other night I ran out to buy some for my brother. I did the entire transaction in Wolof. I was proud of myself, and the two boys working were very amused.)