Meet Burkina

learning & sharing Burkina Faso


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A Day in the Life

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In picture: My lunch today at school. The best school lunch I’ve ever had. Amazingly flavored boneless fish, French fries, brown onion sauce, a tomato slice and a piece of lettuce (quite a treat), and of course, bread. I didn’t eat that whole basket of bread, but my plate was licked clean.

Dakar, Senegal – Tuesday, February 3, 2015

7:45am  First alarm goes off.

7:54am  Second alarm; check to see if Wifi is working. If yes, quickly check Facebook and email for important messages. This morning, and yesterday, our power was out so I couldn’t.

8:02am  Get out of bed; get ready for the day. Put on pants, shirt, and sweatshirt. Mornings are chilly. Go potty, flush. Brush teeth while tank refills and flush again. I almost never can get the toilet paper down in one flush.

8:20am  Quickly eat breakfast – a baguette, a piece of cheese, and hot tea if there’s time. Take malaria pill. Today I left a little late because my mom had new mango jelly she wanted me to try, and Saliou wanted to play with me for a little bit.

8:28am  Head to school; walk quickly. Stop and have a quick chat with anyone you know, or “know” in many cases. Most days I run into my neighbor, Laye, and we hug and chat.

8:59am  Arrive to school.

9:04am  French class starts.

11:01am  French ends. We have a one hour break. Sometimes I will spend this time walking to the Toubab/white person store. It’s essentially a small grocery store. Today I finished up some homework and checked my email/Facebook instead.

11:59am  Wolof class starts. This is by far my favorite class.

2:00pm  Wolof class ends. We have another one hour break. Again, what I do varies. Some days I will buy ice cream and sit near the beach and eat it. Today I ordered and ate lunch at school with my friends. We drink ataaya (tea), after.

3:05pm  Education & Literacy class starts.

6:01pm  Done with school for the day; start walking home. Today I stopped at a fruit stand and bought clementines.

6:35pm  Arrive home; greet anyone at the house.

6:50pm  Drop bag off in room; change into comfier pants.

7:05pm  Socialize with family; test out new Wolof words; struggle with French; play with Saliou, the maid’s baby. Sometimes I go to our roof where Bas’s students are studying and work on homework. At some point the people in my house I’m hanging out with go to the mosque to pray, but I haven’t figured out exactly what time this is yet. At that point, I head to my room and do homework or go online.

8:33pm  Go downstairs to living room so I’m around when dinner is ready. Watch TV/talk if someone else is. Otherwise, write or study.

9:25pm  Eat dinner. It’s always with mama, but the other people around the table varies. My sister is often there, and two of my brothers are often there, but it’s never all of us at the same time. Always someone is out and about. Take vitamins.

9:35pm  Go upstairs; relax; write; homework; laptop; blog.

10:10pm  Shower, change clothes. Wash undergarments.

10:40pm  Walk to Yama’s house, drink ataaya; hang out with him and his friends. Sometimes I ask him for help with my homework. If I don’t go to Yama’s house I hang out with my friends from school, either at their homes or the bar.

12:20am  Yama walks me home; computer; pack my bag for school tomorrow. Fill my water bottles. I force myself to drink 2 liters, minimum, every day. Read my Bible, journal.

1:15am  Set alarm, bed time.

1:17am  Already sleeping.

Learning French: Il sent bon, He smells good. (What I want to say when many a Senegalese man passes.)

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Life today, in lists

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In picture: Me, hanging out at the neighborhood beach. I’ll be back here often.

To buy:

  • electrical converter/adapter (so far I’ve been borrowing a friend’s to charge things)
  • peanuts
  • post cards
  • 10 liter water jug
  • phone minutes

To ask:

  • what time, exactly, is each of the five daily prayers?
  • how do you spell the name of our maid? I can be told something five times, but until it’s in writing I might never remember

To do ASAP:

  • wash underwear (it’s forbidden to give your under garments to the maid for washing)
  • start 3-5 page focus paper on Senegalese cultural values
  • organize/take inventory of my cash, figure out what I’ve spent and how much I have left

Things I miss:

  • warm showers

Things I don’t miss:

  • doing laundry (the maid, every Tuesday, washes, hangs, irons and folds everything)
  • iPhone/texting all day
  • rushing
  • putting on makeup
  • the drink/smoke/bang party scene

Blog post ideas:

  • explanation of structure of Wolof language, as I understand it so far
  • a day in the life
  • my observations about the parallel but strikingly different social scenes
  • thinking critically about child labor
  • different ideas about time, Senegal vs. U.S.

New people:

  • Taylor & Andre (met them at the police station getting visas; Taylor works with an NGO, Andre was down to practice Wolof with me and incredibly sweet)
  • Noussa Gueyè
  • Mahdi (met at bar, young doctor from Tunisia)
  • Mustafa

Homework for this weekend:

  • finish newspaper article presentation preparation with Matthea
  • 1 page essay, in French, definitions of development
  • 2 page Wolof worksheet
  • 8 pages in French workbook
  • prepare country presentation – Sierra Leone, Ghana

Things I’ve learned:

  • “Dama xiff”, Wolof for “I’m hungry” isn’t something to throw around. The use of the pronoun “Dama” means whatever you’re feeling is serious. Practicing my Wolof, I casually said this on the porch. My neighbor immediately got up, and returned 20 minutes later with a (huge and delicious) sandwich. I really could have waited for dinner, and when dinner time came, there was no way I could admit to my mama that I had totally spoiled my appetite.
  • Believe it or not, I’ve lived below about a dozen goats/sheep/big-with-horns-but-I-don’t-know-what-they-are and had no idea until today. This morning I feed them with my brother Papa. They eat, among other things, cardboard box pieces soaked in water.
  • The maid’s son is named Saliou.
  • Senegalese clementines. Nothing compares.

Goals:

  • be better at living in the moment. I’ve had this really weird attitude about time lately that I can’t remember ever feeling. I am getting overwhelmed with how short my time here is. Every day I dread the end. I keep imagining it being entirely shorter than it actually is, and I stress myself out over saying goodbye when really it has just begun.
  • hold short conversation in Wolof by next week
  • find a pumice stone or something and get my feet in check
  • wake up earlier, enjoy the mornings

Learning French: le sable, sand (After the beach today it’s everywhere)