Meet Burkina

learning & sharing Burkina Faso


2 Comments

Destination: Burkina Faso!

In just a little over a week I’ll be on my way back to west Africa, the place I miss most…

I will serve as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Burkina Faso, a landlocked country in west Africa, slighter bigger in size than the state of Michigan, with an estimated population of 17 million people and a life expectancy of 55 years.

I will do pre-service training for the first three months in a village called Léo in southern Burkina Faso. Following training I will serve for 2 years in another village, TBD.

My job title is “Community Health Educator”, and my work may be centered around things like maternal and child health, nutrition, malaria prevention and treatment, hygiene and diarrhea prevention, HIV/AIDS awareness, and teen pregnancy reduction.

Language wise, my French skills will be a huge asset. However, I will also learn at least one other local language. The one I’ll start with is called Moore. Where I’m placed for my 2 years of service will determine if I have to learn another language (on top of French and Moore), and if so, which.

I don’t know many details about how life will look, but I’m excited to share my adventures with my family and friends at home (and in various places around the world).

This last week consists mostly of family time, time with some friends for sure too, and a little bit of organizing/packing.

Next weekend I will first fly to Philadelphia, spending a few days there with other Burkina-bound Volunteers. After that it’s from Philly to Brussels, and Brussels to Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso…

Learning Moore: Laafi bala, I’m feeling good. (Used as the response for many greetings.)

Advertisements


2 Comments

A little reflecting on little changes

IMG_8613

In picture: Me and my globe pillow I’ve had since I was a baby.

PSA to everyone in my life: I live in Ann Arbor, in a big beautiful house with 9 beautiful women. My bedroom is modest but nice. It’s not fully unpacked yet, but that’s okay. You (every one of you) are welcome to come over whenever you want! It’s something I loved so much about Senegal and will miss dearly: it’s not expected, and even can be rude, to ask to come over. Don’t wait for someone to invite you over: they won’t. And if you want to go over, don’t ask. Just go! If that means you are over every day, okay that’s fine. If that means you come over when your friend isn’t home – okay, fine, turn on the TV. If that means you come over when your friend is sleeping – okay, nicely wake him up, or not, but you can stay and hangout. You can treat my bedroom like a Senegalese one, if you want. Stop by! If I’m busy with something important I’ll make just a little time for you, but you can still eat some food and chill while I continue my work. I’m sure just about none of you will take me up on this offer, but it’s honestly there – if you show up at my house unannounced and ask for a drink and snack I will love you for it.

I’ve been home for ten days now and I finally feel like I am able to reflect on my time in Senegal and leaving Senegal. For the first week, it felt sort of like I was physically back in Michigan, but not necessarily emotionally. I still thought thoughts in French. For the first week, when I woke up in the mornings in my bed at home, I had to re-realize that I wasn’t in Senegal anymore. It was always the saddest part of my day. Often I would come close to crying. Once I did.

I realized today in the shower, (where all my best thoughts come), that my four months in Senegal and my next four months over this summer spent in Ann Arbor, are perfect opposites when it comes to many things relating to independence. That’s a confusing sentence I know. What I mean is that, for example, in Senegal I had no control over what I ate, for the first time since I was young. Now, in Ann Arbor, for the first time in my life, I have 100% control over what I eat; I buy groceries and cook all my own meals. In Senegal, for the first time in a long time, I had to be home by a certain time. I kind of had to announce when I was coming and going. I had to be respectful of the family. But now in Ann Arbor, for the first time, I have literally no rules and no one watching over me, (except my dearest roommates like Megan and Kelly of course). Even last year in the sorority house I had a house mom, and there were certain rules (ie: no boys over past midnight, etc.) It’s a weird transition is all I’m saying. The reverse culture shock is real.

Although I feel comfortably adjusted back to life in Michigan now finally, I also realized that some of me will never go back to normal. Waly had told me upon leaving Senegal that this would be a good thing. Senegal did change me, and it would be sad and stupid to think it didn’t. Some changes include:

  • I am more hospitable;
  • I am more willing to share – everything! Food and forks and literally just about anything
  • I am all around more at peace, relaxed
  • I am not as worried about being late, especially to things unimportant, although I still do love punctuality
  • I am more willing to do things I want to/are best for me without worrying about what others think
  • I have embraced life as a privileged American, more on this right here:

I have always known that I am privileged to be an American. I have somewhat understood this privilege too. I’ve known for a long time that people all over the world dream of coming to America, the land of milk and honey. The dreamland. I used to feel sentiments like this: Oh, if only they knew the problems we have here! It’s true, of course we have problems in the U.S. (One journal entry I wrote in Senegal included a list proving a new theory I have about all countries having an exact equal amount of “bullshit”, just manifested in unique ways.) But after my experience in Senegal, I realize that America really is quite a dreamland. Of course it’s easy for me to say that, being an educated, upper-middle class, white woman. However, in general, with enough effort (more is required for some populations perhaps) you really can be successful. Or maybe it’s safer just to talk about myself: I have realized that for me, American privilege means that if I want something enough I can have it.

This realization has amped up my work ethic. After meeting a hundred brilliant people in Senegal who want a job and can’t get one, I realized that I need to take advantage of the privilege and fact that there are so many jobs out there and I need to go get one! I actually recently got two. The first one I will talk about later in this post. The second one is at Tim Hortons, less than a three minute walk from my house; my first day is tomorrow.

Beyond new realizations, Senegal also has left me with a lot of questions. It’s good – there are many things I will continue to think about and educate myself on. The hardest transition of all upon coming home was with Yama. In Senegal, Yama and I were best friends with a side of romance. It’s been hard dealing with the “side of romance” now that I am here. We aren’t dating. And I think we are the kind of people who really can just be great friends for the rest of our lives and nothing else. But he means so much to me, it’s crazy really, and the side of romance has been really hard not to bring in my carryout box back to the U.S. I trust that God will handle the situation and show me what, ahem who, he wants for me. Senegal has made me very patient.

This post is very jumbled I know. There are a few more things I want to mention.

My main job I have, and the reason I am in Ann Arbor, is a research job. I meet with my boss and co-investigator in Ann Arbor, but the research is done in Detroit. The project is really huge, and I would love to tell you more about it if you ask. Basically I will be interviewing immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa who live in Detroit. We want to learn all about their experiences, but specifically will approach those who have started their own business or have influenced specific social circles. As an example, my main task is to interview African immigrants who have started hair braiding salons. (From preliminary research today I found that these women are largely Senegalese! Which is beyond exciting. I will certainly floor them with my Wolof.) My co-investigator is starting by interviewing taxi drivers. We will create a public website with the results.

It seems so far that this job is a perfect transition from my life in Senegal to my life here. I am interacting with Senegal as intimately as possible without actually being there. This intimate interaction with Senegal also comes through my daily conversations with Yama and Sadikh, and also my Wolof lessons from Yama.

We had our first very official Wolof lesson today. Guys, it was by far the best post-Senegal moment of my life. Yama’s patience is unmatched, and we can communicate and fully understand each other all the time, against all odds. We use a free international application called Viber, but we use the voice message feature. Honestly it’s perfect for language lessons! I hear his voice speak the phrases, and he hears mine and makes sure I say it well… but it’s better than a phone call because I can replay the message over and over again. Tomorrow I will go back and review the stuff I learned from him today. I help him with English too, like yesterday when I corrected an essay he wrote about his academic life. We have a perfect system and beautiful friendship.

Beyond Wolof, I also work on my French every day with Rosetta Stone now. I want to get fluent in French of course, but what really motivated me to start was the fact that by the end of Senegal I had gotten really comfortable speaking French and I didn’t want to lose that. Rosetta Stone is obviously amazing. My parents bought it for me in 2011 (but I really haven’t used it), and Senegal taught not to take things like that for granted because not everyone can learn a language if only they want to hard enough.

I read again for fun, currently Divergent. I drink smoothies for breakfast. I scribble out plans in my agenda because it’s therapeutic, even though before I would never do that because it’s not “neat”. I let people come in my room even if it’s messy. Any of ya’ll can wear my clothes. Eat my food and drink my drinks. I give stuff away even if “but maybe I would use it some day”. I cuddle with my globe pillow and let other people too, even though before it was my prized possession only for the shelf. I notice little changes in myself now. They’re good.

Learning Wolof: Maangi sama negg di naan tey. I’m sitting in my room drinking tea. (My favorite phrase from my lesson with Yama today.)


Leave a comment

FAQs

ebolaimage3

With just over a week before I start my journey, I thought I would answer some questions that people frequently ask when I tell them about my upcoming semester abroad.

Are you scared or worried?

In general no, I’m not. I’ve been waiting my whole life for this and I’m ready. The only thing that I might be anxious about is that I don’t feel prepared to carry on conversations in French. I have taken 5 semesters of French at the University of Michigan, but it takes me a really long time to formulate even basic sentences. But, I will be fine! Becoming better at (and maybe even almost fluent in) French is one of the biggest reasons for my studying in Senegal.

What will you do?

I don’t have a super clear idea of what I will be doing, but it doesn’t bother me. From what I understand I will be taking classes for the first half of the semester. It won’t be terribly different from my responsibility as a student in Ann Arbor – go to classes all week, study for them, pass them. The second half of the semester I will switch residences and have some sort of internship, perhaps at a rural elementary school or something. I will get more details once I arrive.

Is it civilized there?

The term “developed” is the most accepted term to use to ask about the standard of living in Senegal. Senegal is considered a generally underdeveloped country when measuring it by various factors. In terms of Senegal’s Human Development, it’s considered a third world country. The Human Development Index measures Senegal’s development, considering life expectancy, years of schooling, and GNI per capita. Is Senegal poor? Most would agree, yes. When considering the rest of the African countries, however, Senegal has average or just above average wealth, depending on the specific value analyzed. Do they lack adequate health systems? Maybe. They don’t have health systems anywhere near that of the U.S. Are they aware of Western technology and ideas? I would imagine that yes, they totally are. It seems to me that there are only very small pockets, if any at all, of people anywhere in the world that are unaware of how life is, in general, for Americans. Their pictures of it may be incomplete or somewhat inaccurate, but I believe that they have a much better picture of our daily lives than we have of theirs. Also, remember, I actually don’t know that much about Senegal.

Do they hate Americans?

I don’t think so. But I don’t know any Senegalese people, so I don’t know what the most common opinion is about Americans. Some people follow up this question with, “But they’re Muslim, right?” They are. And admittedly I don’t know a lot about Islam, but I do know that not all Muslims, or Muslim nations, hate Americans. And if the Senegalese people “hate Americans” as far as they dislike a lot of what the U.S. government has done in the past and present around the world, then I don’t really blame them. In fact, we can probably find many common opinions in this area. I’m 99% sure they won’t hate me, but I’ll get back to you about it.

How many other students from your school are going?

As far as I know, none! I don’t know a single person who is going to be there. The University of Michigan Senegal study abroad program was cancelled due to lack of applicants. I am studying abroad through the University of Minnesota, however, and I believe there will be a handful of students from U of MN to interact with regularly. Coordinating study abroad with the University of Minnesota has been extremely great so far. The staff that I’ve been working with are amazing, their application and preparation process has been smooth and comforting, and I think it’s going to be an awesome program.

Are you living with a family?

Yes! I recently received my home-stay information. I am living with an older woman who has three kids that are moved out. However, my host-mom’s grandchildren usually spend the day at the home I’m staying in. My host-mom’s nephew also lives at this house, and he is 25 and a student. To me, this sounds absolutely perfect. I adore small children and will be excited to have them around. Having someone at the house who is more or less my age (even better, more) might help me have a little group of Senegalese students to be friends with immediately! And, the fact that he’s a guy might mean that he can help keep me safe. Oh, and I’ve never had a brother before; this might be the closest I’ll ever get.

But wait… Ebola?

Yes, that is a valid question. Senegal, like the Ebola epidemic right now, is in West Africa. Am I concerned about it? Not really. Senegal has had only one case and zero deaths. (The U.S. has had four cases and one death). When I try to comfort the concerned individual with these numbers however, they often say, “Yes, but didn’t those Americans contract Ebola outside of the U.S.?” Yes, two of the cases of Ebola in the U.S. were contracted in West Africa, and the other two were nurses who had been treating one of them. However, the patient with Ebola in Senegal did not contract it in Senegal either. My life passion is Africa; if I wait for it to be 100% safe, I’ll never go.

Learning Wolof: Naka mou? How’s it going?


2 Comments

“Where’s that?”

westafricamap

When I tell people I’m studying abroad in Senegal, the response I get a large majority of that time is, “Where’s that?” The ensuing conversation is sometimes entertaining.

“It’s in West Africa.”
“Oh, Senegal is a city in the country West Africa.”

or

“It’s in West Africa.”
“Oh, like by Kenya!?”

No and no. Although originally I was disheartened by the lack of familiarity with Africa by the general public, it doesn’t upset me and I don’t think less of anyone for their ignorance. It’s probably no one’s fault individually, but rather some problem with the U.S. education system or neglect on behalf of the media. Furthermore, perhaps not everyone needs to know about Africa, although I would argue the average American should know more than they do, and I must not take for granted that I’m an African Studies major. I don’t know very much about ionic bonds or derivatives; I don’t study chemistry or mathematics. We all have our own specialities. I also have decided that I have been put into a position where I have a great opportunity to educate my fellow Americans about Africa, or at least the small parts of Africa that I have gained some insight on.

Many of you will know that I studied in West Africa this summer as well. I spent four weeks in Ghana. Although my time in Ghana has helped me prepare for Senegal, the two countries are quite different.

Senegal is a small country, marginally smaller than the state of Michigan, on the westernmost point of contiguous Africa. French, spoken in much of Africa, is their official language. My classes will be taught in French, but I will also learn Wolof, the most widely spoken language in Senegal. Most of the Senegalese population is Muslim.

Although I know a little bit about the history and political climate of Senegal from my classes, unfortunately this is the extent of my knowledge about Senegal. Textbooks would probably never be able to give me a complete and true idea of Senegal anyway, and I’m excited to discover Senegal for myself starting on January 18th.

Learning Wolof: Yendul ak jamm, Pass the day in peace